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/civ/ - Civics
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Anonymous 18/05/17(Thu)07:16 No. 762 ID: 3a3089
762

File 152653421979.jpg - (169.53KB , 1200x800 , DdFvbyrXkAEFW5r.jpg )

If the Kent State students had been armed in 1970, the Ohio National Guard would have killed them all.

They were protesting for peace; they didn't want to have to carry guns, kill people, or fear for their lives--and four of them were killed for it.

Peace is not derived from armament. Deterrents are an inherently short-sighted solution: they only pause an enemy who has already decided to attack you until they acquire equal or better weapons. Best case scenario, the peace of the gun lasts only as long as no one gets angry enough or crazy enough to risk mutual annihilation--someone like that will always be around.


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Anonymous 18/05/19(Sat)11:55 No. 764 ID: e1fd41
764

File 152672371582.png - (39.04KB , 1053x391 , Guns4Girls.png )

School shootings occur at schools whether or not people at the school are armed.

School shootings are about making others feel as bad as the shooter feels about themselves by the act of killing other people's children. The objective isn't for the shooter to live, its to cause others pain.

Two things will happen if schools become heavily armed compounds, where every preschooler to graduate student is armed:
1) More guns will be sold
2) More gun accidents will happen

That's it. School shootings will still occur.

Buying more guns won't solve anything. If buying more guns was going to solve anything it would have happened by now.


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Anonymous 18/05/19(Sat)20:50 No. 765 ID: 2d8cbb

>>762
So sexy. The girl's not bad either.


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Anonymous 18/05/20(Sun)04:10 No. 767 ID: 0ccd16

>>765
Actually yeah, it is pretty sexy.
I'd love to see her tits bounce while she fires it.

I wouldn't want to see her laying in a pool of her own blood with it still strapped to her moments after she thought it would save her life.


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Anonymous 18/05/20(Sun)06:01 No. 768 ID: 9c6ca5

>>767
More of a hands tied behind her back lying in a pool of her own blood type of guy, huh?

I get it.


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Anonymous 18/05/20(Sun)20:42 No. 769 ID: e1fd41

>>768
The fun part about openly carrying a gun strapped to your back is you've turned yourself into an easy target. All they have to do is sneak up behind you and immobilize or take your gun. There's legions of special forces and ex-special forces trained to do just that. Some of them work for police forces.

Her little pew-pew stick isn't the magic she thinks it is.


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Anonymous 18/05/20(Sun)23:08 No. 770 ID: 352252

>>768
Yes.

This >>769; she's no action hero. I don't think it would take special forces; anyone with decent aim could take her out long before she managed to get that thing into her hands; and then they'd have her gun to kill people with too.


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Anonymous 18/05/21(Mon)20:33 No. 771 ID: df75bc

>>769
Yes, ex special forces working for the police is everybody's top concern.


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Anonymous 18/05/22(Tue)07:07 No. 772 ID: fdb5f2

>>770
As long as they can adapt to the terms of being a police officer--that they are meant to protect people, even suspects, so that justice may be served, as opposed to just filling the darkies "bad guys" with lead--I think it's fine if soldiers "retire" into law enforcement. I'm sure there are many soldiers whose contributions would be of great benefit--proper weapons training, reduced flight response, tactical awareness, etc. Given the numerous conflicts we've been involved in the last two decades, I imagine the number of returning vets looking for a job to put their skills to use is rather high.

It only becomes a problem if they lose sight of the purpose of law enforcement: upholding society, protecting people's lives, allowing justice to be served. Deadly force should be a last-ditch option for law enforcement officers, but too often it has been their crutch. This isn't so much a problem with soldiers joining the police, as it is with the tendancy of the police force to become militarized. Regardless of their backround really, all police officers should face rigorous and regular psychological testing and there should be oversight committees preventing police chiefs from buying military gear they don't need. We trust these people with upholding our society, we ought to be sure they are sane enough to do so and reasonably equipped for their job.

If the time comes that we need firing teams and tanks to put down a riot or whatever, that's why we have a National Guard.


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Anonymous 18/05/22(Tue)10:36 No. 773 ID: ead321
773

File 152697818857.png - (11.63KB , 779x112 , NoMajorityForTheMinority.png )

>>771
Everyone's top concern are the nuts hoarding guns and using their arsenals to commit mass murder.


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Anonymous 18/05/24(Thu)22:07 No. 777 ID: 4089f6

>>773
Is it the nuts hoarding guns committing mass murders? Most mass murderers seem to own just enough guns to make their plan work.


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Anonymous 18/05/25(Fri)01:52 No. 778 ID: 1a7788

>>777
Actually, the nuts hoarding guns tend to be mass murdered.
You're right about the shooters, but they often do exhibit ammosexuality long before destiny calls.


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Palindrome 18/05/25(Fri)23:34 No. 783 ID: c8d683

Lately it seem the mass murders are kids who stole from their parents' collection. I miss the good old days of about 4 years ago when we thought the foreigners from the Middle East and Mexico were the ones we had to worry about.


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Anonymous 18/05/26(Sat)12:32 No. 785 ID: 18ef32

>>783
>about 4 years ago
Before that it was
>kids who stole from their parents' collection
Terrorism was a fad.


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Anonymous 18/05/26(Sat)14:54 No. 787 ID: ead321
787

File 152733928787.png - (16.31KB , 890x100 , NRA Slush Fund.png )

>>777
Did you check out how many guns the Vegas shooter had? These aren't people with thousands of firearms. Just having more than a half dozen puts you above the range of a normal gun owner. Most only have one or two.

But one thing is for sure though, most gun owners can't be trusted to properly secure their firearms. Because if you think the gubbermint is going to break down your door at any moment for years on end you can't properly secure your guns. You have to make sure you can commit suicide by cop. Otherwise your family would have to (gasp) sell your guns to try and get some semblance of an inheritance. And that's the worst fate of all. Your guns are more important than your life.

>>778
>Actually, the nuts hoarding guns tend to be mass murdered
Not really. They tend to end up "accidentally" shooting people.

Which is why the NRA is so adamant that there be no limits on the second amendment. If irresponsible ammosexuals were no longer able to purchase firearms, gun sales would plummet, and the NRA slush funds would dry up.


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Anonymous 18/05/29(Tue)08:34 No. 800 ID: e7aae7

>>787
I was thinking Waco, Ruby Ridge, etc. I guess the point there being that they hoarded enough weapons to get the government's attention, and then they were murdered (and helpless to defend themselves against overwhelming numbers, tactics, and armament).

>most gun owners can't be trusted to properly secure their firearms
Apparently this is how you defend your children's freedom to mass murder.

>Vegas shooter
There's a conspiracy theory that this was an arms deal gone bad, that the guy accused of the shooting was laying dead on the floor the whole time, and that his customers escaped--some of them firing shots in nearby streets on their way out. Normally I wouldn't give it much thought, but I noticed a number of articles have recently been revised to make the guy sound more creepy and mentally disturbed--none of that was in the interviews people did in the days immediately following the incident; it was added months later. Then again, it's probably just a story and the later additions might just be the NRA's usual tactic of portraying any mass shooter as a deranged individual who shouldn't have passed the background checks. That's the one angle they're willing to give, since they know background checks are useless--saying they'll support stronger background checks lets them sound like they actually care without making any change to their arrangment with the politicians and gun manufacturers.


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Anonymous 18/05/30(Wed)20:31 No. 803 ID: ead321
803

File 152770506132.jpg - (13.38KB , 550x413 , TrumpClock.jpg )

>>800
>Apparently this is how you defend your children's freedom to mass murder.
Coming soon in the 71st amendment.

>There's a conspiracy theory that this was an arms deal gone bad
There's a conspiracy theory for everything. Conspiracy theories are supported by people who demand that everything fit their preconceived narrative of the world. They see nothing wrong with on one breath talking about how the government is completely incompetent and can't do anything right, while in the next breath talking about how the government is behind all these massive super complicated conspiracies that would require superhuman levels of coordination if not outright telepathic communication.



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